Telt Conference

From Here To Where?

categories

Collaboration

Global Awareness

Information and Technology Literacy

Communication

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

Self-Direction

Creativity and Invention

Plenary Speakers

Thomas Frey

Thomas Frey

Macmillan

2020 and the Future of Education

Jim Scrivener

Jim Scrivener

Cambridge University Press

Jim Scrivener is a freelance writer, teacher and conference speaker. He is best known for his ELT Methodology books...

Prof. Howard Gardner

Howard Gardner

PEARSON / Harvard University

The App Generation
(Video Satellite Conference)

Mini Plenary Speakers

Ferhat Karanfil

Gökhan Yücel

Ministry of Education

Principles of the 21st Century Pedagogy: Personalization, Digitalization and Innovative Skills

Prof. Howard Gardner

Prof. Dr. Gölge Seferoğlu

Middle East Technical University

Gölge SEFEROĞLU is a professor in English Language Teaching (ELT)

Concurrent Speakers

Steven Ogden

Steven Ogden

Cambridge University Press

Steven Ogden currently works for Cambridge University Press as a Teacher Trainer in Turkey and Sales Manager for Iraq.

Tony Gurr

Tony Gurr

Macenta

From Here to Where as a 21st Century Digitally Literate Educator

Charlotte Rance

Charlotte Rance

Oxford University Press

Putting Thinking into Practice With the current buzz about 21st-century learning skills, this session will focus on one of the...

Teresa Doğuelli

Teresa Doğuelli

Macmillan

Life Skills for the New Millenials Our millenial generation is not like any we have had before. Neither is the work and life arena that

Merve Oflaz

Merve Oflaz

Oxford University Press

Teaching the Children of the “Golden Age” Many people state that children are not like “children” any more...

Rikki Brown

Rikki Brown

Ankara University High School

Reviving Literature in ESL in the Technological Age

Sevim Açıkgöz

Sevim Açıkgöz

İstanbul Bilgi University

Effective Digital Storytelling in the Classroom

Ferhat Karanfil

Ferhat Karanfil

Oxford University Press Teaching speaking and reading

In today's classes children want to learn what they are curious about rather than what we want to...

Ferhat Karanfil

Cassondra Puls

Terakki Foundation Schools

Global English and Global Learning

Ferhat Karanfil

Elena Bolel

Maltepe University

Authentic Materials: Good task – Bad Task.

Ferhat Karanfil

Yunus Alper Yılmaz

Queen TESOL Centre

How to make Grammar classes enjoyable

Ferhat Karanfil

Aysegul Liman Kaban

Gedik University

Emotions in action: Say Hi to happy classes

Ferhat Karanfil

Mürüvvet Çelik

National Geographic Learning

A sweet day of hands-on learning for a Web 2.0 world connected to reading.

Ferhat Karanfil

Marsha Maxwell

Terakki Foundation Schools

Wrangling the Adolescent Mind: The Impact of Neuroscience on 21st Century Teaching

Ferhat Karanfil

Türkan Deperlioğlu

Terakki Foundation Schools

Turkan Deperlioglu works as a Language Testing Specialist at Terakki Foundation Schools in Turkey.

Asuman Bozçetin, Gül Dovek and Sibel Weeks

Asuman Bozçetin, Gül Dovek and Sibel Weeks

Terakki Foundation Schools
Teaching with Notes

Not every task we do in our daily lives is interesting or fun,

Okan Bölükbaş

Okan Bölükbaş

Sabancı University

The Power of Strips We will explore two 100% fun activities which not only cater to kinesthetic learners,

Neslihan Önder Özdemir

Neslihan Önder Özdemir

Uludag University

Affective-humanistic English language teaching: The milk of human kindness

Burcu Özgür

Burcu Özgür

Yeditepe University

Learner Autonomy This talk focuses on how to foster learner autonomy. The development of autonomous learning plays a

Jonathan Sayers

Jonathan Sayers (Busuu)

Motivation in Online Learning

As we move into an age where our students will spend an increasing amount of time learning online,

Esat Uğurlu

Esat Uğurlu

GLOBED E-Learning Solutions

E-Learning: Do we really need it in today's classrooms? Our presentation will focus on the history of technology and learning in general

Karim Sadeghi

Karim Sadeghi

Co-author: Maryam Soleimani
Urmia University

The Relationship between Anxiety, Shyness, and Language Learning Strategies across Gender...

Funda Doğrul

Funda Doğrul

Terakki Foundation Schools

Ideas Matter– Actions Count For years, teachers have been trying to make learning more interesting for students whose entire lives have been

Betül Mutver

Betül Mutver

Terakki Foundation Schools

Ideas Matter– Actions Count For years, teachers have been trying to make learning more interesting for students whose entire lives

Özge Karaoğlu

Özge Karaoğlu

Terakki Foundation Schools

Özge Karaoğlu Terakki Foundation Schools, Developing Metacognitive Skills with Technology

Hayley Erol

Hayley Erol

Terakki Foundation Schools

Culture and its Impact on Language Learning Mahatma Gandhi famously said, “A nation’s culture resides in the hearts and in the soul of its people.”

Lana Yılmaz

Lana Yılmaz

Terakki Foundation Schools

Culture and its Impact on Language Learning Mahatma Gandhi famously said, “A nation’s culture resides in the hearts and in the soul of its people.”

İpek Kurcan Şahin

İpek Kurcan Şahin

Terakki Foundation Schools

When There's Laughter, There's Hope For Learning Learning is stronger and more efficient when the process is fun and engaging. Since the 21st century

Uğur Şahin

Uğur Şahin

Terakki Foundation Schools

When There's Laughter, There's Hope For Learning Learning is stronger and more efficient when the process is fun and engaging. Since the 21st century

Nihal Yıldırım

Nihal Yıldırım

İstanbul Bilgi University

What Different Interaction Patterns Can We Use in Speaking Activities? There are many different ways to organize students for a speaking activity and

Ezgi Demirkır

Ezgi Demirkır

İstanbul Bilgi University

What Different Interaction Patterns Can We Use in Speaking Activities? There are many different ways to organize students for a speaking activity and

Institutions' Training Sessions

After completing Sessions 1 & 2 in the Conference Program, attendees will be awarded a certificate by the institutions below.
Şirin Soyöz

Şirin Soyöz

British Council

Funky, Trendy, and Colorful! Promoting Creativity and Innovation in the ELT Classrooms With an emphasis on exploring innovation and creativity...

Phil Keegan

Phil Keegan

British Side

Phil Keegan is CELTA and Teacher Training Manager at British Side English Language School, Istanbul.

Tom Godfrey

Tom Godfrey

ITI

A “whole person learning” approach: Integrating language learning with other disciplines such as dance, music and drama.

Liz Aykanat

Liz Aykanat

ITI

Demand High Teaching: Taking the next step up In March 2012 the Demand High teaching blog was launched...

Işıl Boy

Işıl Boy

Pilgrims

Do you believe in magic? M-learning (mobile learning) is the learning that can be done with the help of portable technologies...

Sarah Oskay

Sarah Oskay

Back to Basics for Very Young Learners?

What are the most current preschool teaching methods for ESL with very young learners?

Beyza Yılmaz

Beyza Yılmaz

Pilgrims

Make the Most out of Vocabulary Teaching with the Wonders of the WebAre you looking for different ways to present new...

Beyza Yılmaz

Dena Van Dalfsen

Queen TESOL Centre

Student-Centred Lesson Planning Guide To the Most Functional and Effective Free Websites

Why TELT?

It has become a cliché in our field that as educators we must “prepare students for an unknown future.” But what does this mean? Who are our students? Today our students compete in football and keep up with the latest iOS updates. They play violins and Minecraft. They have “grasshopper minds,” flexibly and fickly flitting from one thing to the next. They are in the midst of an information and literacy revolution, and will have a technologically-advanced, creatively-enhanced, and interconnected future the likes of which has never been seen.What skills will best prepare them for this future? Children What more can we glean about our students and their future? More crucially, how can we apply these insights to motivate them and enrich their language learning while cultivating in them the skills for what lies ahead?

WHAT WILL YOU BRING, SHARE, AND LEARN AT THE TELT CONFERENCE?

At the Terakki ELT Conference, address these important questions head-on at our Concurrent Sessions, Plenaries, and of course our unique Poster Sessions: succinct, snappy visual presentations concisely illustrating a fresh new project, study, or feature of language use. Listen in, react, respond and share your own discoveries in classroom technology usage, diverse learning styles, global citizenship, gaming and motivation, and many other relevant topics.

The Terakki ELT Conference will combine tried and true conference constants and also feature several firsts. In line with our forward focused theme, for the first time in Turkey, well-known teacher training institutions will conduct training sessions and award certificates to attendants. At our Special Interest Group luncheon, you will have the chance to gather with your peers with similar interests. Then, you can visit our Writers’ Signatures Panels to meet published leaders and experts in the field and catch up on the newest published resources and research. Finally, join us at our culminating Cocktail Night to celebrate the collaboration, sharing, and learning we will have achieved.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

  1. Registration(Entrance Hall)
  2. Opening Ceremony(Auditorium 1)
  3. Bogaziçi Music Club Jazz Choir (K1)(Auditorium 1)
  4. Plenary Speaker 1 Thomas Frey (Auditorium 1)
  5. Writers’ Corner/Poster Session(Entrance Hall/ I3 Building)
  6. Plenary Speaker 2
    Jim Scrivener (K1)
  7. Break (Entrance Hall)
  8. Concurrent Speakers’ Session (I3 Building)
  9. Lunch (Lunch Hall)
  10. Mini Plenary Session 1 Prof.
    Dr. Gölge Seferoğlu (K1)
  1. Coffee Break (K1 Entrance Hall)
  2. Mini Plenary Session 2 Gökhan Yücel ( K1)
  3. Break (Entrance Hall)
  4. Training Sessions (Certificates will be given to the attendees by the institutions) (I3 Building)
  5. Break (Entrance Hall)
  6. Speech Bubbles ‘Oliver’ (Auditorium)
  7. Certificate Ceremony for the Speakers(Auditorium 1)
  8. Raffle / Closing(K1)
  9. Participants’ Certificates will be available at the Registra- tion Desk.(Entrance Hall)
  10. Post-Conference Cocktail Party / Tango Show ( Bogaz- ici University Alumni Center)

TERAKKİ (PROGRESS)

To become an institution in social life requires both a historical tradition and being abreast with the requisites of contemporary times. As one of the institutions in Turkey that possesses both these qualities, the Terakki Foundation has been contributing to the education, social and cultural development of the Turkish society since 1877.

OBJECTIVES OF THE TERAKKİ FOUNDATION

The Terakki Foundation believes that a society can only go forward through training cultured, competent and responsive generations of sound body and mind. The objective of the Terakki foundation is to provide all the means necessary in order to train and educate such generations.

Since 1877 there has been quite a number of amendments to the Founding Charter of the Terakki Foundation necessitated by social, legal and administrative changes, but the article describing its goals remained the same:

  • To open new schools and develop them in order to spread education,
  • To accommodate as many students as the revenues of the foundation permit with free or discounted tuition,
  • To provide facilities conducive to the mental and physical development of youth,
  • To open student hostels and dormitories,
  • To organize youth camps,
  • To arrange for scientific and cultural gatherings, exhibitions and expeditions,
  • To exchange students and instructors with overseas countries

TERAKKİ HISTORY

In the 19th century, Thessaloniki was one of the most important cities of the Ottoman Empire.With its rich cultural, political, and cosmopolitan lifestyle, it was second in the Empire only to the capital city of Istanbul. It was also modern and forward-looking. From Tanzimat to the French Revolution, the city closely echoed the era’s revolutionary modernization movements. It was inevitable that a city which had such a lively social and cultural life should act as one of the Empire’s pioneers in the field of education, too.

It was in this unique and dynamic social milieu that, in 1877, a group of eminent Turkish businessmen came together and founded the Terakki Foundation Schools. The school was a private institution under the name of “Mekteb-i Terakki” and its administration was executed through a council (encümen) in accordance with the principles and structure of a foundation.

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Terakki History

The school provided elementary (iptidaiye) and mid-level (rüşdiye) education. The council was also one of the first nongovernmental institutions in Thessaloniki to prepare a regulation allowing it to establish its own guiding principles. According to these principles, students and teachers of the school would be under the supervision of this council and would be inspected twice a week by two of its members. The goal was to educate entrepreneurial young people in solid moral values, endow them with a good command of a foreign language, and familiarize them with general knowledge of the professional world.

From the start, five key characteristics of Terakki Schools stood out. First, ever since its establishment, the Schools has strongly emphasized foreign language education. Second, befitting the economic needs and changing social structure of Thessaloniki, the Schools focused special attention on trade and economics courses. Third, they accorded great sensitivity to girls’ education: the first two girls’ schools were opened by the Council of the Terakki Schools in 1890. Fourth, the schools were governed in a manner that was open to innovation and new pedagogical ideas. In line with this, the Council and the school administrators began placing a much greater emphasis on cultural and sporting activities, which were deemed an integral part of education. Finally, the Terakki Schools offered one of the Ottoman Empire’s first ever preschool classes.

The school continued its progress afterward, as well. On March 27, 1880, its name was changed to “Thessaloniki Terakki School,” and it began providing high school education after middle school. Due to such rapid improvement and its high-quality education, Terakki quickly became the most desired school in Thessaloniki. Taking parents’ requests into consideration, it opened up a dormitory and a girls’ school soon after. In the early 1900s, the school once again changed its name, this time to “Yadigar-i Terakki Commerce School.”

However, with the outbreak of the Balkan War in 1912, Thessaloniki started to face difficult days. Muslim Turks in the city had to migrate to the east, primarily to Istanbul and Izmir, because of the pressures and difficulties of war. After the Treaty of Lausanne, the remaining section of Terakki School in Thessaloniki, the Yalılar, was liquidated like most other Turkish properties, and the 55-year-long existence of the school in Thessaloniki came to an end.

Fortunately, a new school had already been opened in Istanbul four years before the last section of the school in Thessaloniki was closed. A number of young alumni of Terakki Thessaloniki who had migrated to Istanbul during the Balkan War established “Şişli Lisan Mektebi” (Şişli Language School) in April 5, 1919 in order to carry on the Terakki traditions and pass them on to new generations. Originally opened in September 3, 1919 at the Mahmut Celalettin Mansion, Şişli Language School then moved to the Nuri Paşa Mansion in Pangaltı on September 1, 1920 after a fire on June 24th of that year destroyed the first mansion. Shortly thereafter, in 1921, the school changed its name to Şişli Terakki School. As in its first years, this school was also managed by a council (encümen) composed of founding and protecting members.

Until acquiring its own building in 1935, the school continued its operations as a fully-equipped co-ed boarding school by hiring mansions suitable for educational services in the Nişantaşı and Pangaltı area. Şişli Terakki School used Ferit Paşazade Mehmet Bedri and his mother’s property in 1922; Şerif Paşa and Munire Sultan’s mansion in 1924; Halil Rifat Paşa’s mansion in 1927; and the Baş Mabeyinci Mansion in Nişantaşı in 1928.

In 1935, the Terakki Foundation purchased the Baş Mabeyinci Mansion from the Emlak and Eytam Bank, and after the demolition of the old mansion in 1949, a new and modern school complex began to be built. The school complex was completed in 1962, with its front side facing Teşvikiye street, back side facing the Akkavak alley, and large hall in the middle. In 1969, two more floors were added to the front side.

In March 17, 1934, Şişli Terakki School was sold to an LLC of the same name. However, this was only a formality as the company holders signed a letter of commitment pledging to follow the Terakki path and principles with no expectation of profit by any means. In 1963, the company’s initial legal status of “Foundation” was changed to “Establishment” according to the regulations of the time. Then in 1967, a new law numbered 903 once again made it possible to establish foundations. In this way the Terakki Establishment was turned into the Terakki Foundation, and the Foundation began to run the school. The founding members of this foundation were Abdurrahman Malta, Ahmet Elberger, Akif Akev, Fahri Refiğ, İbrahim Telci, Necdet Üçer, Nuri Türen, Osman Üçer, Reşat Atabek, Yusuf Kapancı, Ata Refiğ, Rıfat Edin, Fikret Güvenç, Mehmet İnal, Memduh Paker, Nazmi Eren, Vedat Uras, Ecvet Gürses, and Neş’e Deriş.

The first step toward the Levent facilities, which comprise today’s campus, came in 1966 with the purchase of a 25,800 square meter plot of land. In 1973, construction of the primary school building started, and in 1975, construction of the first unit was finished. In 1983, the second unit was finished and was opened to students and teachers. On July 14, 1991, the foundation of the Levent Campus, where all the units of the Terakki Schools would be housed, was laid.

The founding principle of the Levent Educational Facilities was to merge an applied education with a social, athletic, and cultural education to educate the productive workforce required by an industrialized information society. For this reason, the Levent Campus includes technology-equipped classrooms, laboratories, libraries, meeting and conference halls, cafeterias, information technology facilities, auditoriums, an Art Gallery, and Sports Facilities–all in the service of education.

The Terakki Foundation Schools serve society at large through its Kindergarten, Primary School, Middle School, High School, and Science High School in one of the most beautiful places of Istanbul. It will also start providing education at its new Tuzla Tepeören Campus from the 2014-2015 academic year onwards.

From the very beginning, one of the important features of the Terakki Foundation Schools has been its non-profit, non-commercial nature, as expressed by the founding principal “The Terakki School lives for charity and with charity.” Since then, the school has continued its progress in line with its institutional goals, and it has established a vision of education that is best expressed as “to be a Terakki student is to be fully prepared for life.”

Terakki Foundation Schools’ accomplished past and continued progress are a clear indication of its status as a successful and deeply-rooted institution within the Turkish national education system.

*Terakki in Ottoman Turkish means progress.

OUR

VISION

To prepare students for whatever the future may hold and to equip them with the skills to contribute to that unknown world.

MISSION

The mission of Terakki Foundation Schools is to ensure that its students:

  • care about nature and the environment,
  • respect all cultures and diversities,
  • are aware of their rights as individuals,
  • develop an inquisitive mind,
  • know how to gain access to information
  • are self-confident,
  • are devoted to the principles of Atatürk,
    secularism and democracy, and
  • have ethical values,

and to enable them to be individuals who never give up on being life-long learners in order to ensure a peaceful world for all.

CONTACT


Terakki Vakfı Okulları Ebulula Mardin Caddesi
Öztürk Sokak, No:2 34335 Levent-İstanbul
T. +90 212 3510060 (281)